Chen Style Taijiquan Collected Masterworks - The Internal Fighting Arts Podcast Interview with Mark Chen

Chen Style TaijiquanThe newest edition of the Internal Fighting Arts podcast features an interview with Mark Chen about his new book, "Chen Style Taijiquan Collected Masterworks: The History of a Martial Art."

In this valuable book, Mark, who was a formal rumen disciple of the late Grandmaster Chen Qingzhou, translates key sections of Chen Zhaopi's book, published in 1935.

We talk about many issues during an hour and 37 minutes, including the challenges of translating Chinese to English, the origin of Taijiquan, the life of Chen Zhaopi, and how he helped boost the reputation of Chen Taiji during 17 days in Beijing, when he stood on a platform and took on all challengers.

That would be a great kung-fu film -- "17 Days in Beijing" -- the story of the rise of Chen Taijiquan, based on Chen Zhaopi on the platform.

Zhaopi was born three years before my own grandfather, and in China, Taiji fighters like Zhaopi were still battling revolutionaries with swords. That is part of my interview with Mark.

We also explore the idea that in an age when we no longer fight revolutionaries with swords, martial arts take on a more academic, theoretical nature.

This is the 45th edition of my podcast. You can listen online or download the file through this link. It will also be available on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Podbean and anywhere you find podcasts.

The book is available on Amazon. Here is a link to the U.S. page for the book.

 


Join Me in Madison This Weekend for Chen Huixian Workshop Nov. 1-3

Huixian Form 7I will be in Madison, Wisconsin starting this Friday, Nov. 1 through Sunday, Nov. 3 to study with Chen Huixian. If you live within driving distance, I hope you'll join me and train with one of the best.

Chen Huixian is an in-door disciple of her uncle, Grandmaster Chen Zhenglei. Other uncles include Chen Xiaowang and Chen Xiaoxing.

She grew up in the Chen Village and is highly skilled. Each time I train with her, I come away with deeper insights because of the personal corrections and coaching that she gives me.

She is teaching a workshop that will include the following:

Friday Night 6:00 to 9:00 p.m.

** Zhan Zhuang (Standing Stake)

** Silk-Reeling

Saturday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. (with a 2-hour lunch break)

** Chen Straight Sword Form (1st half)

Sunday 9:00 a.m. to Noon

** Chen Straight Sword Form (1st half)

Sunday 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Laojia Erlu ("Cannon Fist") Review and Corrections

Chen Huixian's workshops are punctuated with laughter. It is very refreshing to have an instructor of her caliber -- a Chen family member -- who brings a healthy sense of humor to classes, and an interest in the people who attend. She gives a lot of personal feedback to each person. She speaks English, so you get the information directly from her, not through an interpreter.

If you live within driving distance of Madison, I hope you'll join me this next weekend. Here is a link for more information and to sign up. Click the "SAVE ME A SPACE" button on the page to get the fees, etc.

And check out this video to see Chen Huixian in action.

 

 

 


Chen Huixian Workshop Nov. 1-3 in Madison Wisconsin Will Teach Chen Taiji Straight Sword, Silk-Reeling and More

Push Hands 15
Chen Huixian coaches two students at the 2018 workshop in Madison.

Chen Huixian will teach the Chen Taiji Straight Sword form at a workshop in Madison, Wisconsin on November 1-3, 2019. She will also review and give corrections on Zhan Zhuang, Silk-Reeling, and Laojia Erlu (Cannon Fist).

I will be there and I hope you'll join me to learn from a highly-skilled member of the Chen family.

Chen Huixian is a great teacher, an "in chamber" disciple of her uncle, Chen Zhenglei. Her other uncles include Chen Xiaowang and Chen Xiaoxing.

Her workshops are an outstanding experience. She gives a lot of personal attention to students, is actually interested in the people who attend, she answers questions, and she offers corrections and coaching that will move your skills forward. She speaks English, which means there is no need for an interpreter between what she says and what you hear. 

Her workshops are traditional and serious. You will eat bitter. But she has a sense of humor that adds an element of fun that is lacking in some workshops. Laughter is not uncommon when Chen Huixian is in the room. It's a refreshing experience.

I am not bashful about my enthusiasm for Chen Huixian's teaching. Each time I have trained with her, I believe I have gotten better.

The workshop is sponsored by Patrick Rogne, owner/instructor at Ancient Root Taiji in Madison. 

You can sign up for part of the weekend or, like me, sign up for all of it. Here is how the training will break down over three days:

Friday, Nov. 1 from 6:00-9:00

-- Zhan Zhuang and Silk-Reeling practice and corrections.

Saturday, Nov. 2 from 9:00 a.m. to Noon and from 2:00 p.m. to 5:00

-- Chen Straight Sword form

Sunday, Nov. 3 from 9:00 a.m. to Noon

-- Chen Straight Sword form

Sunday, Nov. 3 from 2:00 p.m. to 5:00

-- Laojia Erlu (Cannon Fist) review and corrections

Interested in joining me in Madison? Go to this link for video and for more information on the workshop, the location, and a place to reserve your spot:

https://events.ancientroottaijiquan.com/chen-huixian-bio?fbclid=IwAR1rwl5TCuQ3jsM0Z7c4aC4S7_rpkCQcrzo1I3WqgrO6RAEQwzVTVBywoZc


Say No to Noodle Legs -- Do Not Collapse Your Legs in Tai Chi, Xingyi and Bagua

Collapsed Leg 4-BestSee the two images here in this post?
 
The top image shows a mistake that I see a lot. In fact, there is a good chance you are making this mistake in your forms, especially Bagua and Taiji.
 
I spent several years making this mistake and I was never called on it.
 
Then, I was training with Chen Huixian and her husband, Michael, and they pointed it out. I was doing "Buddha's Warrior Attendant Pounds Mortar" and it was pointed out that my rear leg was collapsed.
 
In the top photo, my right leg is collapsing. I have lost my peng.
 
Collapsed Leg 2In the lower image, I am maintaining peng through the legs.
 
As you can see in the upper image, my stability and strength is far less with a collapsed leg. I cannot "defend from all directions."
 
It is a lot more difficult to maintain peng in the legs. It helps to relax and sit deeper into the kua, and it requires a lot of mental focus until you break the habit of collapsing.
 
That one bit of advice changed a lot of my stances. And now, I see people collapsing their legs a lot; even some people who are called masters.
 
Sometimes, there is no one to tell a master that he has gotten lazy, or perhaps his teacher did not teach him this particular thing.
 
Don't have "noodle legs."
 
Try to find a mirror so you can watch to see if your legs are collapsing. Watch for it in all movements. In Bagua, I see it a lot in movements such as "Sweep the Rider from the Horse" and similar movements.
 
It happens often when you are shifting weight -- the knee on the non-weight-bearing leg will collapse. 
 
Remember to maintain peng throughout the entire body at all times.
 
The photos are taken from my book, "Internal Body Mechanics for Tai Chi, Bagua and Xingyi." If you don't have it, you can click the link and buy it through my website or through Amazon.
 

Practice Tip -- You Kneed to Read This

Chen Taiji SteppingI have been sending out weekly training tips to members of my website and other people on my email list. If you would like to join the list and receive weekly emails, use the form at the bottom of this post.
 
This week's training tip is short and sweet.
 
The next time you work on a form and you come to a stepping movement, put the energy in your knees when you step.
 
If you think about it, most of the time you probably are just moving the leg, or stepping with the foot on movements such as "Stepping Three Steps" or "Whirling Upper Arms" (performed by stepping backward).
 
If you put your mind and your energy into the knee, and use the lifting of the knee as the focal point of your stepping, you will find that your steps will become more light and lively (as long as you don't stomp down as you land).
 
So don't lift the foot when you step, and don't lift the leg -- lift the knee. Think of having your "energy in the knee."
 
It will keep you from shuffling your feet, which is never a good thing, and it will make your steps more lively.
 
Also, when doing moving push hands or otherwise engaging with a partner to practice close-up fighting techniques and methods, the livelier you step, the more you can defend against foot sweeps or other disruptions of your structure if the opponent uses his legs and feet to try to unbalance you.
 
Let me know if you have any questions on any of the material the site or on the DVDs.

Connecting with the Yang Family -- an Interview with Holly Sweeney-Hillman

Holly-Sweeney-Hillman-Sword1One of my favorite reasons to do my Internal Fighting Arts Podcast is the enjoyment I get when I talk with dedicated martial artists.

I have never interviewed someone who has studied tai chi directly with the Yang family until now.

The new edition of the podcast features an interview with Holly Sweeney-Hillman. 

She is a student of Yang Zhenduo and Yang Jun, and she teaches Yang Family Tai Chi Chuan in the Bedminster area of New Jersey. 

Her website is www.taichistrong.com.

In this interview, we talk (among other things) about balance, her love of the science of movement, what it is like to study with Yang Zhenduo and Yang Jun, and the upcoming International Tai Chi Chuan Symposium, to be held next month in Italy. 

If you like this podcast, please send the link to your friends in the arts. It is also available on Spotify, iTunes, Stitcher, Audello, and other podcast platforms.

 

 

 


Seattle Taiji Instructor Derryl Willis - the Internal Fighting Arts Podcast Interview

DerrylI met Derryl Willis at a Chen Xiaoxing workshop in Chicago several years ago. He is a disciple of Grandmaster Chen Xiaowang and the instructor at the Seattle School of Chen Style Taijiquan. He has made many trips to China to study in the Chen Village. And on his first visit, he stopped traffic just by walking down the street. 

In this Internal Fighting Arts podcast interview, I talk with Derryl about the meaning of being a disciple, the importance of practicing the basics, and a valuable technique that one of his teachers, Madame Gao Fu, used to drive home the body mechanics of Taiji.

 

 

Tai Chi and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu -- The Internal Fighting Arts Podcast Interview with Graham Barlow

Graham-Barlow
Graham Barlow

I came across Graham Barlow's blog, the Tai Chi Notebook, a few months ago and saw that he would be a good guest for my podcast.

Graham has studied Tai Chi for 25 years and began studying Brazilian Jiu Jitsu at age 39. He now has his black belt in BJJ.

So do the skills for self-defense in Tai Chi transfer to jiu jitsu, or does BJJ simply give you more tools for your arsenal?

Here are links to the podcast. Listen online or download it for listening on the go. It is also available to subscribe in iTunes (Apple Podcasts).

Graham Barlow interview via Stitcher

Graham Barlow interview via Audello

Internal Fighting Arts podcast on iTunes 

 


New DVD - The Yang Tai Chi 24 Form Instruction with a Fresh Perspective on Body Mechanics

Yang 24 300 CoverIn 1990, I won a Gold Medal at the AAU Kung-Fu National Championships performing the Yang Tai Chi 24 Form, the short form that is practiced daily by millions of people worldwide. It is the most popular Tai Chi form in the world.

It took me 28 years, but I finally recorded step-by-step instruction and put it on a DVD. It is 2-1/2 hours of step-by-step instruction with a fresh perspective on body mechanics and movement.

The DVD includes complete demonstrations of the form from front and rear views, at regular speed and in extra slow motion. Then, I guide a student through each movement. That student happens to be my wife, Nancy. I teach her the form as we go, and you will learn by watching the mistakes she makes and you will learn what to avoid as I humiliate, I mean COACH her through the movements. Nancy is a good sport, and there is an outtake reel at the end of the DVD.

Even if you have studied the Yang 24 form, I believe this DVD will give you new insights into the body mechanics of the movements. I show you details of the movements that are rarely taught by instructors who teach this form.

The video is already online on my website, Internal Fighting Arts. Many of my members began their Tai Chi journey with the Yang 24, as I did. The reactions to the instruction have been better than I expected.

When I began teaching in 1997, the Yang 24 was part of my curriculum. I taught it for a few years, even after I switched from Yang style to Chen style in 1998. After studying the body mechanics of Chen Tai Chi, I realized what was missing in a lot of the Yang Tai Chi that you see being performed around the world.

Many people are doing an empty form. This DVD attempts to correct that. You will learn how the ground path, peng jin, whole-body movement, Dantien rotation and the kua are used in the movements. You will learn how to sink your energy and use spiraling movement.

The Yang 24 was designed by a committee of experts in Beijing in 1956. It was intended to be a simplified form that people of all ages could use for fitness, exercise, and "moving meditation." Tai Chi is a martial art first and foremost, but the Yang 24 is not usually practiced that way.

This DVD is intended to teach the form for health and fitness. Clinical studies have shown that older people who practice Tai Chi see benefits ranging from improved balance and leg strength (fewer falls among the elderly) and reduced blood pressure and stress.

You will learn the Yang 24 Tai Chi form from this DVD. This is a Tai Chi beginner form that got me started in the art. It fits into anyone's hectic, modern lifestyle, and it can bring you benefits in health and quality of life.

The DVD costs only $19.99 and it comes with an Iron-Clad, No-Hassle Money-Back Guarantee. There is Free Shipping Worldwide. If you aren't satisfied for any reason, mail it back and receive a prompt refund, including your mailing costs.

 

Click the button below for our secure order page. 

 


Using Internal Principles in Grappling -- How to Escape a Clinch

Can Tai Chi, Xingyi or Bagua be used against a grappler?

A lot of macho types say no, but that's because they do not understand the internal martial arts.

Tai Chi has been slandered, maligned and unfairly criticized during the past year or two because a couple of people who claimed to be Tai Chi "masters" (they are not masters) had the stupidity to take on a trained MMA fighter and they lost. Badly.

I had a Wing Chun guy come into my school once and he wanted to spar full-contact. I told him we didn't do that, but we would gladly spar with him and do light contact. We hit him in the face anytime we wanted. My top student and I both tried him out. It was pitiful, but I did not judge Wing Chun based on this guy.

The internal arts have principles and body mechanics that work if you follow them, just like any art. Sometimes, you simply have to fight. That includes punching. But sometimes, you use body mechanics to take advantage of your opponent's force or to break his structure.

This past Wednesday night at practice, three students -- Justin Snow, Colin Frye and Chris Andrews -- worked with me as I demonstrated how to escape from a clinch. We had a good time playing with this.

Justin and Chris are both around 300 pounds. They are strong guys, around 30 years old. They have experience fighting. Real fighting.

I am 65 with one lung, heart issues, and I lost a lot of muscle mass when I got sick 9 years ago. 

They still can't hold me in a clinch if I use internal principles. And I can't hold them, either.

We had fun playing with this. Enjoy the video and I hope you learn from it. And remember, 850 video lessons and pdf downloads are available 24/7 on my membership website at www.internalfightingarts.com. Check it out.