Training in Xingyiquan: the Internal Fighting Art Podcast Interview with Byron Jacobs

ByronByron Jacobs has become the first martial artist to appear on my Internal Fighting Arts podcast three times. He is a teacher of Xingyiquan and Bagua Zhang living in Beijing. He is a disciple of Di Guoyong.

In this wide-ranging discussion, we cover several topics, including how the Chinese people view their own government, the meaning of Xingyiquan "Classics," and what training is like with traditional Chinese gongfu teachers. We talk about the importance of forms and whether that should be the focus of your training and several other fascinating aspects of quality training, including the value of choreographed two-person sets and why you should take a notepad and pen to your next practice.

Here is the page to the podcast episode:

https://internalfightingarts.libsyn.com/website/internal-fighting-arts-58-byron-jacobs

You can listen online or download it. The Internal Fighting Arts Podcast is also available through Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and other podcast distributors.

Byron teaches online through his Mushin Martial Culture videos on Patreon. His does an excellent podcast -- the Drunken Boxing Podcast, which is available through the usual podcast distributors.


Get Out of the Bubble and Pressure-Test Your Tai Chi, Xingyi and Bagua

Byron Jacobs, an outstanding martial artist and teacher of Xingyiquan and Baguazhang, does the Drunken Boxing Podcast. He recently interviewed Mario Napoli, another great martial artist who went to the Chen Village and won a push hands tournament there. Here is the link to the YouTube version of Byron's interview with Mario. The Drunken Boxer Podcast is also available through Spotify and other podcast distributors.

One of the interesting topics they discussed was the problem of Taiji people not wanting to test their push hands against other martial artists.

Chris Lorenzen and Ken Gullette
Ken Gullette (left) and Chris Lorenzen

One of my former students, Chris Lorenzen, has gotten into Brazilian Jiu Jitsu during the past year or two. So I invited him to stop by one of our practices a couple of weeks ago to pressure-test our arts and to exchange information. I have a lot of respect for other martial arts and I like to see them up close.

It was a lot of fun. Besides banging around a little, we asked about BJJ and he gave us a few demonstrations of techniques on the floor. 

I believe that if your arts are not effective, you are living in a bubble of fantasy. So I like for other martial artists to stop by our practices. 

Most of us are instinctively too tense when another person comes in to take us down. We expect to use muscular tension to defend and counter. But often, that tension is what your opponent uses to control you because they can connect more easily to your center.

We practice relaxing when an opponent uses force, and combining that relaxation with other body mechanics including the ground path, peng jin, using the kua and more to "empty" and then redirect the force our opponent is using.

A couple of months ago, I spent five days in the hospital with blood clots in my left lung, and I'm on blood thinners right now. It's frustrating to be more fragile than I used to be and not able to go as hard as I used to, so I think Chris took it a little easy on me. It was still a valuable experience to feel his technique and learn what I could. Justin and Colin were able to go a little harder with him.

My favorite thing is to square off with other martial artists and ask them to take me down. It isn't about punching and kicking for me anymore. My goal is to get close to them and maintain my center while I take control of theirs. Anyone can punch and kick, but can you make him go off-balance and take advantage of him at the right moment? If someone grabs you to take you down, and uses force on you, can you handle it with relaxed internal strength?

Chris Lorenzen and Justin Snow
Chris Lorenzen and Justin Snow on the ground.

I love to work on it. If they try to take me down and have a hard time because I can keep them from finding my center, that's a good thing. And if I can take them down instead, that's even better. I try to be strict with myself, avoiding the use of localized muscular tension and trying instead to use good Taijiquan principals and methods. I did a DVD on some of these methods of close-up self-defense and you can find the DVD through this link. 

One of the interesting things Mario and Byron talk about in the podcast is how some Taijiquan teachers are calling themselves "master" and yet they have never pressure-tested their skills in competition. If you don't pressure-test your martial ability, Mario Napoli says you are just "moving air" when you do a form. 

"Forms lie to you," he says, and he is right. You can do movements all day and think you can apply it in self-defense, but it's a completely different ballgame when someone is putting the pressure on you.

So get out of your bubble. Invite different people to your workouts. It should be friendly, of course. You don't have to go full-contact because getting hurt is not a good option for adults who have other responsibilities and careers, but there should be a risk of being "shown up" and taken down. Your ego might be deflated a bit, but it's a small price to pay for the truth. We can always get better, but not if we become legends in our own minds.

Let's face it, if you aren't pressure-testing your arts, you are probably not as good as you think you are.

 


Are You Part of a Martial Arts Cult? The Internal Fighting Arts Podcast Interview with Louis Martin

True BelieversSome people want to become martial arts teachers or "chi masters" for the same reasons some people become ministers or politicians.

Some people want to be figures of authority. They want others to look up to them, to see them as having amazing skill, as a direct pipeline to God, as someone with Ultimate Wisdom, or as someone with supernatural powers.

Even in martial arts, there is no shortage of people who will bow down before a "master." Students might play along with their "chi master" teacher and fall down when he waves his hand. Or they will jump and hop away when their tai chi "master" touches them lightly during push hands. They will talk about their teacher as if he (it's almost always a "he") is god-like. 

Nobody wants to admit they belong to a cult. 

Louis Martin is the author of "The True Believers," a book about his experience in a martial arts school with cult-like tendencies. It is an interesting story for anyone in martial arts. Follow this link to find the book on Amazon

Louie is the guest on the latest Internal Fighting Arts Podcast. Here is the link to the podcast. You can listen online or download it to listen to later. 


From Count Dante to the Chen Pan Ling System: The Internal Fighting Arts Podcast Interview with John Scott

John Scott and His SifuThe new Internal Fighting Arts podcast features an interview with John Scott, a teacher of the Chen Pan Ling system in Maryland and a tournament champion.

He has been in martial arts for a half-century, ever since he bought some of Count Dante's training materials as a kid. 

We have a good time talking about the martial arts journey that led him to his teacher, Grandmaster Chen Yun Ching, the son of Chen Pan Ling. The photo at left is John Scott standing next to Chen Yun Ching.

Follow this link to either listen online or download the file. It's also available on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Podbean and other podcast distributors.

https://internalfightingarts.libsyn.com/internal-fighting-arts-54-john-scott


From Break Dancing to Wudang Mountain to Bagua Zhang -- the Internal Fighting Arts Podcast Interview with Jakob Pang Isaksson

Jakob Pang IsakssonJakob Pang Isaksson, a Bagua Zhang teacher in Stockholm, has lived an interesting life. In 1998, he won an MTV Break Dance Competition and appeared in a Run DMC video, "Sucker M.C.'s." Watch the video here.

A few years later, he traveled to Wudang Mountain to search out gongfu instruction. He returned to China later and spent three years there. He won medals at a large wushu competition and was selected to perform and compete with the Guang Zhou University professional Wushu Team. Eventually, he found his Bagua Zhang teacher, Li Jian Min, a teacher of Jiang Style Bagua Zhang.

I talked with Jakob Pang Isaksson about his experiences and it made for as very interesting podcast.

Go to the podcast page where you can listen to it or download the episode.

 


Treating Early-Stage Covid-19 Patients with Traditional Chinese Medicine - the Internal Fighting Arts Podcast Interview with Dr. Stephen Jackowicz

Covid-19Can Traditional Chinese Medicine help patients who test positive for Covid-19?

Dr. Stephen Jackowicz, the chair of the doctoral program at the University of Bridgeport's Acupuncture Institute has treated more than 90 patients in the early stages of Covid-19, all of them testing positive and some of them very ill.

None of the patients progressed to the point of hospitalization. 

It is important to note that Dr. Jackowicz does NOT claim a cure. Using over-the-counter products that anyone fighting virus symptoms needs (Tylenol, Kaopectate, Ensure or Glucerna, etc.) and courses of herbal medicine using TCM practices, he says patients recover faster than without this treatment.

He is the interview in my latest Internal Fighting Arts podcast. It will be of interest to other TCM providers, regular medical doctors and nurses, and anyone concerned about the virus that has changed all of our lives in 2020.

I am a skeptic when it comes to TCM. I think a lot of claims are made that cannot be supported with solid medical evidence. Dr. Jackowicz does not make those claims. I would not have done this interview if he did.

This is episode 52 of the podcast. Listen or download through the player below, or find it on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or other podcast distributors.

I think you will find this interesting and informative.

 


Nabil Ranne and the Art of Chen Style Taijiquan - The Internal Fighting Arts Podcast Interview

Nabil Ranne 1
Nabil Ranne, instructor of Chen Style Taiji in Berlin and a disciple of Chen Yu.

The latest guest on my Internal Fighting Arts podcast is Nabil Ranne, a Chen Taijiquan instructor based in Berlin. He is a disciple of Chen Yu, the son of Chen Zhaokui who lives in Beijing.

Nabil is a co-founder of the Chen Style Taijiquan Network Germany. His website is www.ctnd.de.

We talk about the differences between Chen Yu's taiji and the taiji taught in the Chen Village, among other topics. 

You can listen online below or download the audio to play later. You can also subscribe and share this podcast (and I hope you will). Total running time is one hour 22 minutes.

 

 

 


Born a Chen -- the Internal Fighting Arts Podcast Interview with Chen Huixian

CHX_CWTIf you were able to have a conversation with a member of the Chen family, what would you ask?

On the 50th edition of my Internal Fighting Arts podcast, I have a nearly two-hour conversation with Chen Huixian.

Among the topics we discuss:

What was it like growing up in the Chen Village?

What is it like being a woman teaching in a martial art long dominated by men?

Does the Chen family hold back information from outsiders?

What was it like moving to the United States when you had never been here before?

As the milestone approached for the 50th edition, I have hoped for months that she would do an interview. I'm very happy that she did.

Chen Huixian is the only Chen family member living and teaching Taijiquan in the United States.

She lives with her husband, Michael Chritton, in Overland Park, Kansas, part of the Kansas City area. Michael was the guest on my very first podcast. It is really cool, in my humble opinion, that Huixian would be the guest on the 50th. These are good people, as you can hear if you go back and listen to the first podcast and also this one.

Chen Huixian was born in 1981 in the Chen Village and her uncles include Grandmasters Chen Xiaowang, Chen Xiaoxing, and Chen Zhenglei. Her father was Grandmaster Chen Chunlei. Her grandfather was Chen Zhaopi.

You can listen to the podcast or download it on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Podbean and other distributors. Here is a link to the Stitcher page:

https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/internal-fighting-arts/e/73897646?autoplay=true

-- by Ken Gullette


41 Years Teaching Internal Arts in the Big Apple - The Internal Fighting Arts Podcast Interview with Frank Allen

Frank Allen
Frank Allen

I love to interview dedicated martial artists.

The latest Internal Fighting Arts podcast features an interview with Frank Allen, a veteran internal arts instructor whose school, Wutang Physical Culture Association, located on the Lower East Side of New York City, is celebrating its 41st year in business in 2020.

Frank Allen began studying the same year I did -- 1973.

Frank is a Master lineage holder in Classical Northern Wu Style Taijiquan through his teacher, Grandmaster Li Bing Ci, and a Master lineage holder in Classical Cheng Style Baguazhang through his teacher, Grandmaster Liu Jing Ru.

His other instructors have included B.P. Chan and Bruce Frantzis.

Together with Tina Chunna Zhang, Frank Allen has written books including "The Whirling Circles of Ba Gua Zhang," and "Classical Northern Style Wu Taijiquan."

Frank, Tina and the Wutang Physical Culture Association were featured in their documentary, which you can see on Amazon Prime Video, called "Tai Chi Club." It is an outstanding and moving documentary.

I have always wanted to interview someone who has studied personally with Liu Jing Ru. Frank tells colorful stories of his training.

You can use Audello to listen to the interview online or download the file by clicking this link.

You can also listen or download through Podbean by clicking this link.

Or click Play on the Stitcher link below. The podcast is also available on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and other distributors. Subscribe today!

 

 

 


Internal Arts Training Tips are Featured on Newest Internal Fighting Arts Podcast

Internal Fighting Arts - Ken Gullette Logo 300For the past year, I have sent out a training tip every Friday. Today, I sent the 52nd email.

To celebrate the one-year anniversary, I collected some of the training tips and created my first podcast episode of 2020.

It is also the first Internal Fighting Arts podcast episode that does not include an interview.

There is a theme that begins to weave its way through the training tips and it becomes obvious by the end.

Listen through this link or download the file to your computer.

http://internalfightingarts.audello.com/internal-fighting-arts-46-training-tips/

The podcast is also available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Podbean and other podcast distributors.

If you'd like to be on my weekly training tip email list, just drop me a note at ken@internalfightingarts.com.